Global Skywatch

Ted’s essays

emergency medical inventory

I retired nurse friend of mine shared her list with a group of us. I, in turn, am sharing it with you. Field Hospital Inventory (* denotes essentials) Trauma bag Personal protection gear – each in separate zip lock bags vinyl and nitril gloves – your size and some large size if different (*) surgical masks (*) plastic (food service type) apron eye protection Cleaning supplies sm. bottle of surgical (green) soap or plain dish soap fingernail brush hand towels Normal saline – burn and wound cleanser (*) baking soda – acid burns sm bottle vinegar – alkaline burns plain salt – to make more normal saline gauze sponges 60 cc syringe – or cheap condiment squeeze bottle small pack […]

November 4th EMP

Next Saturday may well be very interesting. (As in the Chinese curse: May you live in interesting times) PART 2 As Elias Alias covered handsomely in the post EMPBS, coronal mass ejections or man-made EMPs could thrust us violently into the stone age. If you just arrived at my website and haven’t heard of these, use the above link to study up in a hurry. Next weekend The Deep State’s Department of Homeland inSecurity is running an EMP drill. Eeeek!!! Federal drills have a bad habit of coinciding with a very real version of what they are practicing for. Even more disconcerting, The Drill coincides with the widely publicized beginning of the Soros-and-Friends financed revolution against Trump and FOR […]

turning points

My first-born’s upcoming birthday inspired my pondering of where I was at his age, and where I went from there. In the photo to the right I am standing in my seven foot tall cover crop of oats, bell beans and vetch. I began studying agriculture in college earlier, fortunately running across Bob Cannard before I wasted a ton of time becoming mal-educated by the reigning ‘conventional ag’. I was about five years into learning how to work WITH nature, listen to her, help her, and subtly discovering that the dominant school of thought was just flat WRONG in the agricultural realm. The Bob Cannard school of thought has many names, but its successes are irrefutable. We can, and […]

47 computer and laser years

I was a US Air Force computer operator in 1970, running state-of-the-art commercial computers at a time most people had never seen any computer and had no idea what they did or how. The picture on the right has mostly peripheral equipment with the RCA 301 computer being the big box in the center against the wall. In the systems that I operated, that box had 17K (17,000 characters) of core storage. By comparison, today you can buy an Arduino Micro with 32K (about double) of flash memory and A BUNCH MORE computing power for $19.80 … or about $1.80 in 1970 dollars. Yesterday I posted computers circa 1970 because at the same time I was an Air Force computer […]

computers circa 1970

Given the choice between kill (people I did not know and certainly did not hate) or be killed in the jungles of Vietnam, I enlisted in the US Air Force. In retrospect, I helped with a lot of killing, but I didn’t mean nuthin’ by it. I spent the working part of my 4-year enlistment as a computer operator, and most of that running an RCA 301. Computer operators read the lights, and wrote our instructions to the lights. Milly was the master I learned from, and I ended up exceeding her. I was a geek before geeks were invented. This miraculous machine that could process data at light speed had gen-u-ine Core Storage of 17K. That was A LOT […]

Santa Rosa firestorm

This was a strange one. For a century, one house could burn to the ground while those on either side were saved by firefighters. The Santa Rosa firestorm was somehow different. I would have scoffed at someone suggesting I should evacuate my city-lot home because there was a fire miles away. That is simply NOT A THREAT. But I would have been wrong. How many people perished in those fires because they were students of history and widely known fire science instead of obeyers of orders from higher authorities? But this one was different. Freaky-different. Glass melted. Aluminum melted. Steel melted. Cultured stone melted. GONE. Appliances are gone. Every dang entire house turned to ash. That simply does not happen. […]

introducing new communication systems

The following is a convoluted way to explain my realization today that two-way radio communications networks must be developed in an organized, methodical way. I became an “Office Automation Coordinator” when the term was first introduced within the Hewlett Packard Corporation. We sailed uncharted waters, figuring out how to integrate the new “microcomputers” into the office and manufacturing environment. Tasked with putting computers on the desks of every manager in our 2,000-person division, I focused on training their secretaries so I wouldn’t have 50 high-powered managers jerking me around all day long every working day for the rest of my career. I developed my own classes to teach them installing computers, peripherals, word processing, spreadsheets, and graphing software. I taught […]

Why Did it Have to be … Guns?

by L. Neil Smith Over the past 30 years, I’ve been paid to write almost two million words, every one of which, sooner or later, came back to the issue of guns and gun-ownership. Naturally, I’ve thought about the issue a lot, and it has always determined the way I vote. People accuse me of being a single-issue writer, a single- issue thinker, and a single- issue voter, but it isn’t true. What I’ve chosen, in a world where there’s never enough time and energy, is to focus on the one political issue which most clearly and unmistakably demonstrates what any politician—or political philosophy—is made of, right down to the creamy liquid center. Make no mistake: all politicians—even those […]